Tag: nurse

Three Souls…


Three Souls” – Bev Meade, MSN, RN, MHA, CEN, CCRN, CFRN, CTRN, TCRN, EMT-P. Flight Nurse, MedFlight 3.

Our pilot completed his safety checklist and risk assessment, and contacted our Columbus, Ohio, Communications Center with the first radio traffic of the morning: “MedComm, this is MedFlight 3. We have 3 souls, 1 hour 30 minutes in fuel, 8 minute ETA.”.  This radio transmission is always given before we lift from our helipad to begin our mission.  The response was as expected from our experienced Communication Specialists watching over all of us… they monitor us flying and driving our patients “to and fro” for this company.  They acknowledged us with “Copy MedFlight 3… 3 souls, 1 hour 30 minutes in fuel, 8 minute ETA”, and we lifted into the cool, pre-dawn calm with our Night Vision Goggles (NVG’s) down and activated.

 

Our mission was to transport a patient with an ST -elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) from a rural area in Ohio to the closest cardiac interventional facility… rapidly, efficiently, and safely.  As we landed at the remote landing zone (LZ), we did as we were taught and as we have done hundreds of times on landing… We focused our attention outside diligently, looking through and around the NVG’s for hazards that could mean disaster for the “three souls” on board.

 

Safety is and has always been a top priority for my company, and I am thankful that we are recognized as one of the most safety-conscious critical-care transport organizations in the state.  We communicated succinctly with the local fire department at the LZ, and were acutely aware that our safe landing could mean the difference between life and death for our patient, whom we have yet to meet, and, of course, for us as well.  Even though the “three souls” on board have thousands of safe arrivals, each landing and takeoff still makes me alert, tensed, & ever-vigilant for the unseen hazards that we all know are out there.

 

“MedComm, MedFlight 3.  We’re ‘skids down’ safely”  is what we all wanted to hear, and that is exactly what transpired.  As usual, I thanked my pilot for a safe landing and waited until the blades came to a complete stop before exiting the aircraft to retrieve the necessary equipment, supplies, and of course… my paramedic! As we walked to the waiting EMS vehicle,  I contemplated what we might find, what might need to be done quickly, and what a difference we can make in this person’s life.

 

After assessing and placing appropriate monitoring equipment on our patient, we departed the EMS vehicle in under 7 minutes to rapidly load & secure our patient for the lifesaving transport he desperately needed.  Our pilot once more pierced the airwaves with “MedComm, MedFlight 3.  Lifting from scene with 4 souls, 1 hour 20 minutes in fuel, 30 minute ETA” and we departed the rural hills of Ohio for the center of the state, where critical interventions awaited this patient.

 

After arriving at the receiving hospital and transporting the patient to the cardiac catherization lab, we became “3 souls” again… the team of 3 who answer the call of duty, who respond without hesitation to help the sick and injured, whose life’s work and studies have led each soul to this place, at this time. And I know that there are others just like us at MedFlight around the nation that are awake at 0200, answering the incoming radio or telephone call, responding just as quickly and safely to save the life of another soul. 

 

The mission was completed, the cardiac vessel reopened, and the patient was recovering to resume his life in southeastern Ohio.  As each of the “three souls” completed the post-flight tasks, readying the aircraft for the flight home… me completing the patient care chart and sending it to the receiving facility, the medic restocking the aircraft for another mission if needed, and our pilot refueling for the flight home or to another destination as needed…  I paused for a moment to consider what we had just accomplished.  All of us played a part in the outcome of this patient: Family, EMS, our Communication Center, all of our ancillary personnel, the flight crew, and receiving facility… Each entity relying on the other to do their jobs and save a life.

 

As we were enroute to our base, I considered the new day dawning as the sunrise peaked above the hills of southeastern Ohio where I call home.  I announced “goggles up”, and I contemplated how each of us have a pivotal role in this mission.  I am still in awe after 20 years serving others in critical-care transport how all of this happens almost seamlessly to improve the outcome of our patients.  But, perhaps, more importantly…  I looked to the right toward my medic, and in front of me to my pilot, and I am thankful that each one of the “three souls” are where they are supposed to be, doing what they are supposed to do, and that each of us bear the burden of safety and excellent patient care and quality transport so that we can hear once more “MedComm, MedFlight 3 is safe on deck with three souls” as we land at our helipad…  Mission accomplished.



	

Why A Nurse/Medic Crew Configuration?

Since the inception of air medical transport in the early 1970’s,  the “ideal” crew composition has been the subject of much discussion.  There has been a variety of team types: RN/MD, RN/RN, RN/Medic, RN/RRT, etc.  While each type of crew configuration offers many theoretical benefits, there is little scientific research to support any specific mix of medical crew members.  Most air medical programs in the United States operate with a RN/Medic crew.

MedFlight believes that critical care nurses and paramedics can be trained in skill performance to the level of a physician.  In addition to conducting ongoing quality reviews of the procedures performed by our crews, an annual competency program, and continuing education to enhance clinical skills, each MedFlight transport is supervised by an identified Medical Control Physician who is immediately available to the crew and who provides input regarding the care of the patient.  Each MCP has specialty training in adult emergency medicine, pediatrics, neonatology or high-risk obstetrical care, depending on the patient’s condition.

MedFlight crews are trained to perform and well-versed in, among other skillsets:

  • Rapid Sequence Intubation using paralytic agents
  • Oral and Nasotracheal Intubation
  • Surgical and Needle Cricothyroidotomy
  • Conversion of peripheral IV line to 8.5 Fr introducer for rapid fluid administration
  • IO insertion
  • Pericardiocentesis
  • Needle chest decompression
  • Intra-Aortic Balloon Pump management and transport
  • Ventilator management
  • Monitoring of arterial catheters and Swan-Ganz catheters
  • Monitoring of pulse oximetry and end-tidal CO2
  • Transcutaneous pacing
  • Maintenance of transvenous pacemaker
  • Burn escharotomy

Mobile ICU and Flight Teams also maintain several clinical certifications above and beyond their RN and Paramedic licensures.

The RN/Medic crew configuration offers the most cost-effective method of medical care delivery in the critical care transport environment.  MedFlight is committed to providing the highest level of care for the lowest cost to patients, receiving hospitals, and third-party payors.

We’re proud of the quality work and dedication our clinical crews produce daily.  There are decades of experience at each MedFlight base.  If you have additional questions regarding MedFlight and our capabilities, please visit our website or on social:  @MedFlightOhio.  Partners for Life.

Dr. Howie Werman, Medical Director of MedFlight & Emergency Physician at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

 

 

Coming to Preble County: MEDFLIGHT

Kettering Health Network and MedFlight are expanding their critical air transportation partnership by adding a permanent medical helicopter base at the Preble County Medical Center in Eaton, Ohio.

 Kettering Health Network plans to construct the base, which will include a hangar and crew living quarters. The permanent base will be staffed by critical care nurses and paramedics, pilots, and mechanics 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. During construction, a helicopter will be based at the Preble County Medical Center during the day starting within the next 90 days.

“We are pleased to expand our partnership with MedFlight to serve the people of Preble County and the surrounding counties in southwest Ohio,” says Fred Manchur, Chief Executive Officer of Kettering Health Network. “MedFlight, along with Kettering Health Network’s comprehensive emergency and trauma services, offers life-saving service close at hand for people with a life-threatening injury or illness who need to get to a hospital fast.”

 Kettering Health Network’s partnership with MedFlight began in 2013, when MedFlight placed a medical helicopter base nearby in Fayette County, serving Kettering Health Network and other partnering health systems and communities to the east of the greater Dayton area, including Fayette and Clinton counties.

In the greater Dayton region, MedFlight will provide critical care transportation of patients between Kettering Health Network hospitals and other hospitals as necessary. The helicopter will also respond to accident scenes and transports patients to the most appropriate hospital for critical care.

Furthermore, MedFlight’s new base will add an additional resource to the existing fleet to support other affiliated hospital partners throughout Ohio.

“MedFlight is honored to partner with Kettering Health Network in serving southwest Ohio by providing customer-focused medical transportation solutions,” says Tom Allenstein, President of MedFlight. “This community resource will reduce response times for critical patients in need, who will now receive faster critical care.”

Kettering Health Network

Kettering Health Network is a not-for-profit network of eight hospitals, 10 emergency departments, and 120 outpatient facilities serving southwest Ohio. The network’s hospitals are Kettering, Grandview, Sycamore, Southview, Greene Memorial, Soin, Fort Hamilton, and Kettering Behavioral Medicine. Kettering College, a division of Kettering Medical Center, is a fully accredited college that specializes in health science education. Kettering Health Network is recognized as one of the 2016 Truven Health Analytics 15 Top Health Systems in the United States.

MedFlight

MedFlight is a non-profit air and ground critical care transportation company based in Columbus, Ohio that completes thousands of critical care transports by Helicopter and Mobile Intensive Care ground units each year.  MedFlight is made possible by its consortium health systems of OhioHealth and The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center.  MedFlight also has a partnership with Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus. MedFlight received the air medical industry’s highest safety award in 2012 and was named “Program of the Year” in 2014.

Welcome to the MedFlightOhio Blog!

It’s a new year!  We’re excited to start this venture to compliment our online presence, and we hope you like our new blog!

It’s going to be a great way to go into more detail about projects we have going on, happenings with us around the state, and much, much more.  This industry is 24/7 and things happen and change fast.  What better way than a blog to keep you in-the-loop with MedFlight.

So sit back and enjoy, and let us know what you think!  Partners for Life. Into the sun....